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Red Devil Fish vs Oscar

Red Devil Fish vs Oscar

The Red Devil fish and the Oscar are two freshwater titans that are extraordinarily popular in the fishkeeping hobby, and both have their pros and cons. Here’s everything you need to know about Red Devil Fish and their compatibility.

 Red Devil Fish are large cichlids that can grow up to 15 inches and need a minimum tank size of 55 gallons, preferably larger. They are super aggressive and not generally considered compatible with other fish.

As you can see, the Red Devil Fish isn’t for beginners. The rest of this article will discuss the differences between the two and how to choose which is right for you.

Red Devil Fish Overview

Red Devil fish are a type of cichlid that’s extremely aggressive towards other fish. Native to Central America, these beautiful fish have a distinct size and appearance that makes them stand out at once in a fish tank. They can live for up to 12 years, grow to a size of 15 inches, and are highly aggressive.

Among the largest aquarium fish you’ll ever see, these powerful fish vary greatly in color, from red to grey to green—even pink devil fish are common.

Big teeth and powerful jaws make the devil fish a nightmare to handle in the fish tank, happily preying on other bottom-dwellers and killing them at the slightest opportunity. In contrast, they form strong bonds with their owners, interacting dynamically and following them from one end of the tank to the other.

Red Devil Fish Care and Tank Requirements

Red Devil Fish require a lot of attention, and a tank size of 55 gallons is the minimum you want for these fish to mitigate aggression and offer a good quality of life. While 55 is ok, 75-90 gallons is preferable and provides the fish plenty of space to swim around. They need water conditions to be in the following parameters:

  • pH levels of 6-5-75
  • Hardness of 6-25 dGH
  • Moderate water flow
  • Stable temperatures of 75-79 degrees Fahrenheit or 24 to 26 degrees Celsius

Regular water changes are crucial for maintaining good water parameters, and Red Devil Fish will appreciate a tank filled with fine sand substrate and plenty of hiding places. These simulate the Red Devil Fish’s natural habitat and effectively reduce stress in the tank. Of course, you’ll want to lodge these decorative elements by anchoring them in the sand.

Doing so prevents your Red Devil Fish from playing excavator and rearranging the tank. Hide your filter, heater, and hoses as much as possible (or get external ones) to reduce the risk of your Devil Fish chewing them. Cords also pose a high risk for your Devil Fish, so keep them out of the way as much as possible.

They’re omnivorous, so no aquatic plants allowed—unless you want them to be gobbled up as a snack, of course. A spacious tank is ideal for a Devil Fish to be happy. These fish are big and needs lots of room to swim around and stay active.

Can Red Devils Live with Other Fish?

If the overview of these little devils hasn’t clued you in yet, then the short and sweet answer is no, Red Devils are not compatible with other fish. While they are juveniles, Red Devils will be able to manage being around other aggressive or semi-aggressive fish.

As adults, they won’t tolerate tankmates, and all bets are off on the safety of your other fish. A super large tank has a better chance of success by providing everyone ample room to move around and have their own territories, but there’s never any guarantee with a Red Devil Fish. It usually takes prime position at the top of the hierarchy.

What Fish Get Along with Red Devil?

It’s less a question of what fish get along with the Red Devil and more about what fish are tough or aggressive enough to live with the Red Devil. You’ll only want to pair the Red Devil with other Cichlids such as the following:

  • Other Red Devils
  • Firemouth Cichlids
  • Jaguar Cichlids
  • Zebra Cichlid
  • Oscars

Keep in mind that these fish aren’t easy to take care of either, but pairing large fish with the Red Devil helps reduce the risk of injury by establishing a hierarchy and spreading the aggression evenly throughout the tank.

Passive fish like Rasboras, Ember Tetras, Kuhli Loaches, and Denison Barbs can all work in a Red Devil Fish tank, depending on your little devil’s personality.

There’s no guarantee that these fish will survive, however, and it’s perfectly ok to have a Red Devil live by itself in a tank.

What Fish Are Similar to Oscars?

Oscar fish are also quite difficult to deal with, but they have a certain unique charm to them as well. Their aggressive behavior also makes them difficult to care for at times. When pairing Oscars with other fish or looking for similar types of fish, you’re often looking at other types of cichlids.

Zebra Cichlid

The Zebra Cichlid, for example, are a similar size and have a similar temperament. These two in a tank tend to establish their territories and stick to their own.

Jewel Cichlid

The Jewel Cichlid has a more streamlined shape, but unlike the Oscar, it has beautiful jeweled blue or green markings on its body. Less aggressive than the Oscar or Red Devil, Jewel Cichlids are a popular choice similar to the Oscar.

Jack Dempsey

The Jack Dempsey is another type of fish that has a wide appeal for its characteristic markings, beautiful scales, and expressive face. It’s highly territorial and big, growing up to 15 inches in size. These fish are carnivores and ideal for a tank size of 80 gallons or more.

Final Thoughts

The Red Devil is a large, aggressive cichlid that doesn’t generally pair well with other fish. If you’re thinking of getting one of these, make sure that you have at least a 55-gallon tank for 1 and a 120-gallon tank for 2.

The Red Devil fish and the Oscar are two freshwater titans that are extraordinarily popular in the fishkeeping hobby, and both have their pros and cons. Here’s everything you need to know about Red Devil Fish and their compatibility.

 Red Devil Fish are large cichlids that can grow up to 15 inches and need a minimum tank size of 55 gallons, preferably larger. They are super aggressive and not generally considered compatible with other fish.

As you can see, the Red Devil Fish isn’t for beginners. The rest of this article will discuss the differences between the two and how to choose which is right for you.

Red Devil Fish Overview

Red Devil fish are a type of cichlid that’s extremely aggressive towards other fish. Native to Central America, these beautiful fish have a distinct size and appearance that makes them stand out at once in a fish tank. They can live for up to 12 years, grow to a size of 15 inches, and are highly aggressive.

Among the largest aquarium fish you’ll ever see, these powerful fish vary greatly in color, from red to grey to green—even pink devil fish are common.

Big teeth and powerful jaws make the devil fish a nightmare to handle in the fish tank, happily preying on other bottom-dwellers and killing them at the slightest opportunity. In contrast, they form strong bonds with their owners, interacting dynamically and following them from one end of the tank to the other.

Red Devil Fish Care and Tank Requirements

Red Devil Fish require a lot of attention, and a tank size of 55 gallons is the minimum you want for these fish to mitigate aggression and offer a good quality of life. While 55 is ok, 75-90 gallons is preferable and provides the fish plenty of space to swim around. They need water conditions to be in the following parameters:

  • pH levels of 6-5-75
  • Hardness of 6-25 dGH
  • Moderate water flow
  • Stable temperatures of 75-79 degrees Fahrenheit or 24 to 26 degrees Celsius

Regular water changes are crucial for maintaining good water parameters, and Red Devil Fish will appreciate a tank filled with fine sand substrate and plenty of hiding places. These simulate the Red Devil Fish’s natural habitat and effectively reduce stress in the tank. Of course, you’ll want to lodge these decorative elements by anchoring them in the sand.

Doing so prevents your Red Devil Fish from playing excavator and rearranging the tank. Hide your filter, heater, and hoses as much as possible (or get external ones) to reduce the risk of your Devil Fish chewing them. Cords also pose a high risk for your Devil Fish, so keep them out of the way as much as possible.

They’re omnivorous, so no aquatic plants allowed—unless you want them to be gobbled up as a snack, of course. A spacious tank is ideal for a Devil Fish to be happy. These fish are big and needs lots of room to swim around and stay active.

Can Red Devils Live with Other Fish?

If the overview of these little devils hasn’t clued you in yet, then the short and sweet answer is no, Red Devils are not compatible with other fish. While they are juveniles, Red Devils will be able to manage being around other aggressive or semi-aggressive fish.

As adults, they won’t tolerate tankmates, and all bets are off on the safety of your other fish. A super large tank has a better chance of success by providing everyone ample room to move around and have their own territories, but there’s never any guarantee with a Red Devil Fish. It usually takes prime position at the top of the hierarchy.

What Fish Get Along with Red Devil?

It’s less a question of what fish get along with the Red Devil and more about what fish are tough or aggressive enough to live with the Red Devil. You’ll only want to pair the Red Devil with other Cichlids such as the following:

  • Other Red Devils
  • Firemouth Cichlids
  • Jaguar Cichlids
  • Zebra Cichlid
  • Oscars

Keep in mind that these fish aren’t easy to take care of either, but pairing large fish with the Red Devil helps reduce the risk of injury by establishing a hierarchy and spreading the aggression evenly throughout the tank.

Passive fish like Rasboras, Ember Tetras, Kuhli Loaches, and Denison Barbs can all work in a Red Devil Fish tank, depending on your little devil’s personality.

There’s no guarantee that these fish will survive, however, and it’s perfectly ok to have a Red Devil live by itself in a tank.

What Fish Are Similar to Oscars?

Oscar fish are also quite difficult to deal with, but they have a certain unique charm to them as well. Their aggressive behavior also makes them difficult to care for at times. When pairing Oscars with other fish or looking for similar types of fish, you’re often looking at other types of cichlids.

Zebra Cichlid

The Zebra Cichlid, for example, are a similar size and have a similar temperament. These two in a tank tend to establish their territories and stick to their own.

Jewel Cichlid

The Jewel Cichlid has a more streamlined shape, but unlike the Oscar, it has beautiful jeweled blue or green markings on its body. Less aggressive than the Oscar or Red Devil, Jewel Cichlids are a popular choice similar to the Oscar.

Jack Dempsey

The Jack Dempsey is another type of fish that has a wide appeal for its characteristic markings, beautiful scales, and expressive face. It’s highly territorial and big, growing up to 15 inches in size. These fish are carnivores and ideal for a tank size of 80 gallons or more.

Final Thoughts

The Red Devil is a large, aggressive cichlid that doesn’t generally pair well with other fish. If you’re thinking of getting one of these, make sure that you have at least a 55-gallon tank for 1 and a 120-gallon tank for 2.

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