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Are Banggai Cardinalfish aggressive?

Are Banggai Cardinalfish aggressive

Banggai cardinalfish are mild-mannered, non-aggressive species. They can show some defensive behaviors, but only when provoked. Banggai cardinalfish are among some of the most beautiful fish that you will ever see. They are increasingly popular in saltwater tanks, with more and more people wanting to see their stunning shades in their own home waters.

Over the years, the cardinalfish has gained quite the reputation for being aggressive, especially in tanks –

But the truth is that, banggai cardinalfish are not aggressive fish at all. In fact, they can live quite happily in harmony with each other, as well as other types of fish.

So, why have they got such a reputation for being aggressive?

As gentle as Banggai Cardinalfish can be, that does not necessarily mean that they will shy away from a fight if needed. They are quite territorial and will become imposing towards one another when fighting for their part of the tank.

That is why they are considered to be semi-aggressive at absolute worst. In order to avoid the banggai cardinalfish from fighting in the tank, it is best to choose a pair – one male, one female. This will help to tone down the chances of your fish getting territorial.

Can banggai cardinalfish live with clownfish?

Clownfish and banggai cardinalfish can live together, hypothetically, but there are some circumstances where this may not be such a good idea. Typically, in the wild, both types of fish are very territorial, with female clownfish, in particular, being very aggressive to protect their home. However, when bred in captivity, they do not have to face the same circumstances and therefore tend to be more passive.

However, can banggai cardinalfish live with clownfish in captivity all the time? Again – it really does depend on a few factors. Both species tend to be even more territorial when they are paired up. As with many fish species, two males going head-to-head is never a good idea.

Therefore, if you are planning on keeping banggai cardinalfish and clownfish together in the same tank, it is best to have them each as a single fish. It would also be wise to keep an eye on them for the first few days to ensure that there is no intense aggression shown towards one another. As long as the tank is big enough and both fish have access to their necessary foods, then you shouldn’t expect any issues from here on out.

How many banggai cardinalfish can be in a tank?

Fish keepers who are interested in owning banggai cardinalfish are advised to not have more than two specimens in their saltwater fish tank at any one time. It is best to have a mating pair in the tank to avoid any issues with territory. However, there have been a few circumstances in which many banngai have been kept in the same tank – it’s inadvisable.

It is essential to understand that keeping more than one or two banggai together is very risky. Banggai cardinalfish are indeed very territorial – despite generally being only semi-aggressive – and have been known to kill each other, especially when kept in too proximity. They could potentially live together in bigger numbers if a fish tank is big enough to provide adequate space for them, however, they would all need to be very passive!

Sadly, it may be impossible to know whether your cardinalfish are passive or aggressive before housing them together. By the time you would understand, it could be too late, and significant harm, if not death, could have been caused to more than one of your swimmers. That is why it is best for you to have a maximum of two banggai cardinalfish in your saltwater tank and opt for a mating pair to avoid any issues between them.

Can Banggai Cardinalfish live alone?

Yes, banggai cardinalfish can be kept alone. In fact, it may be better for them if they are! As mentioned, these fishes are territorial by nature and do not tend to fare well when kept with too many others of their same species. While they can live peacefully with other fish and tend to be more aggressive towards other banggai, they can live perfectly happily on their own.

If you are worried about them lacking interaction with other fish, then you should consider getting another banggai with care – but make sure it is of the opposite sex. This will help provide them with a mate and reduce the chances of the two being aggressive towards one another. Breeding banggai shouldn’t be too tricky – and when you put two males together, it can be a recipe for disaster.

If you are considering getting one or more banggai cardinalfish, then opt for those bred in captivity. However, they tend to be even less aggressive; but that is not their most important aspect. Banggai cardinalfish in the wild are suffering in numbers, especially with the increase of people who want to keep their own saltwater fish tanks. Therefore, to buy more responsibly and help these little fish, it is best to adopt those bred in captivity.

Is it worth adopting banggai cardinalfish?

While banggai have a reputation for being a little testy when it comes to living with other species – or even mixing with their own – they are highly rewarding to watch and keep over the years. In fact, if you only want to adopt and keep one fish in particular, it’s worth considering a lone banggai.

It is worth adopting banggai cardinalfish if you are just getting started with a tank of your own. It’s perhaps best not to consider them if you have too many other species swimming around. However, do not pay any attention to rumors that these fish are ill-tempered or are simply ‘bad news’ in general – they can make wonderful pets. Just make sure you give them the care and space that they deserve!

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Hello, there. Welcome to my blog. I am Erik and I’m the main editor of Sealife Planet website.

My passion and hobby has always been scuba diving. My mission is to grow this website and help others with useful information about the sea world. Enjoy!

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