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Can I Put Shrimp In My Turtle Tank?

Can I Put Shrimp In My Turtle Tank

There are a lot of people that recommend that you add shrimp to aquariums and tanks. After all, shrimps are bottom feeders, and they are great at keeping a tank clean. But, should you add shrimp to a turtle tank?

On this page, not only are we going to tell you whether you can put shrimp into your tank, but we are also going to answer some of the more burning questions that people have about the type of water that you should be using. 

Can I Put Shrimp In My Turtle Tank?

A lot of people consider putting shrimp into their turtle tank, particularly ghost shrimp. This is because shrimp are fantastic cleaners. They can munch away on algae growth, food that drops into the water, etc. The problem is that your turtles will find the shrimp delicious. This means that, sooner or later, they are going to attempt to eat the shrimp.

A lot of people that have shrimp in their turtle tank notice that the shrimp are brilliant at avoiding the mouths of the turtles. The shrimp move much faster than any turtle can. However, sooner or later, their luck runs out.

Eventually, every shrimp in that turtle tank is going to end up as turtle food, and there isn’t really a lot you can do about it. Even the most well-fed of turtles will eventually want to have a bite of the shrimp swimming around in their tank.

So, while you can put shrimp in a turtle tank, it isn’t really recommended. The shrimp won’t last for long. If you are happy with replacing the shrimp regularly, then go for it. It can work, although we can’t imagine that the shrimp will be that pleased with it.

You may be able to delay their demise by providing them with plenty of places to hide in the tank, e.g. lots of plants and rocks.

Can I Use Bottled Water For My Turtle Tank?

Unlike fish, turtles aren’t too fussed about the water that they are swimming around in. As long as the water is clean, then you shouldn’t run into too many issues. Generally speaking, if water is safe for you to drink, then it is safe to use in a turtle tank. Just make sure that it is properly filtered and that you clean it regularly. 

This means that you can use bottled water for your turtle tank. However, we do suggest that you avoid anything labeled as ‘mineral water’.

There is a small chance that the high mineral content in the water could have an adverse impact on your turtle. A very small chance, but do you really want to take the risk?

You don’t really need to do anything to the bottled water once it has been added to your turtle tank. You can just pour it in. Furthermore, you will also be able to use the water to fill up any water bowls that your turtles may have.

What Kind Of Water Do You Put In a Turtle Tank?

Turtles aren’t really too fussy about the type of water that they are swimming around in. In fact, it doesn’t really matter too much about what they are drinking, either.

As long as the water is clean and has no added chemicals to it, then this should be fine. You can even use tap water if you want.

The preferred water option for a turtle tank will be to use the cleanest water that you can find. This means distilled water.

You can even use bottled water if you want to save a bit of cash on the water that you are adding to your turtle tank. As we said, as long as the water is clean, then you are probably not going to need to worry too much about it.

We recommend that you steer clear of tap water wherever possible, though. Especially if you live in an area with a high mineral content in the water (i.e. hard water). You should also avoid using tap water if there is a high chlorine content.

This is something that could have an adverse impact on your animals. If you are going to be using tap water in your tank, then we suggest that you use a water conditioner. You can purchase this from most pet stores.

The job of the water conditioner is to help ensure that the turtle tank is going to be healthy for your turtle.

Can I Use Purified Water In My Turtle Tank?

In most cases, you should be able to use purified water in your turtle tank. However, do bear in mind that purified water is different from distilled water.

In some cases, purified water will have been treated with chlorine. Because it has been treated with chlorine, it is not going to be suitable for your turtles unless you use a water conditioner on it first, just like if you are using tap water in the tank.

You will be able to pick up a water conditioner from most pet stores. Always make sure that you follow the instructions on the bottle of the water conditioner to ensure that the water is going to be safe for your pets to swim around in.

In most cases, all you really need to do is add a couple of drops of water conditioner into the water, leave for a short while, and then you are ready to go.

If the purified water that you are using has not been treated with chlorine, then you can use it straight in the tank. There should be no need to add a water conditioner.

This is because the water is already going to be clean enough for your animals. That being said, most people will use a water conditioner ‘just in case’. After all, the water conditioner is not going to do any harm to your pets, and it is very much a case of ‘better safe than sorry’.

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Erik Miller

Passionate scuba diver

Hello, there. Welcome to my blog. I am Erik and I’m the main editor of Sealife Planet website.

My passion and hobby has always been scuba diving. My mission is to grow this website and help others with useful information about the sea world. Enjoy!

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